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Fibonacci Folding Book Project – iPad App

One of the things that got lost in the shuffle of my extra busy summer was the news that Richard developed a brand new version of the Fibonacci Folding Book Project App for the iPad. Back when Apple introduced a new operating system, it knocked out the original App out of action.

Fib Book

The brand new Fibonacci Folding Book Project App is formatted like a magazine and includes step-by-step instructions on making the Fibonacci Folding Book with your students. It’s free from iTunes!!

The version for Android tablets remains available on Google Play.

The photograph above shows an example of a first grader’s work, making the Fibonacci Folding Book Project. See more about this project here.

Video from the Sky: Drone in Maine, New Hampshire

During our recent trip, Richard took along his DJI Phantom II drone and GoPro Hero 3 camera. Here’s the video he edited with his footage.

2014-07Vacation from richard campbell on Vimeo.

Vacation: Maine chapter 2

Our final stop in Maine was with the Mayher/Martins. Garrett ‘Boo’ Martin joined Hope Enterprise Corporation in 1999, and he and his wife, Jenny Mayher, moved to Jackson, Mississippi, that year, shortly before their first child, Essie, was born. They moved to Maine before Essie started school. It’d been six years since we’d seen them. Once again, the drone featured prominently in our fun.

Vacation Maine Boston New Hampshire-1221In the back yard.

e

jo jo Unfortunately, Jo-Jo was feeling pretty terrible. He was having fun, though, I swear.

e w droneEssie had to be talked into flying the drone.

e with j

 

e with boo

group without boo

D with Sparky
This is the tiny little car that got us from Boston to New Hampshire and back to Boston. We called it “Sparky.”

Vacation: Maine chapter 1

After New Hampshire, we visited two families in Maine. The first were the Turgeons. Elizabeth is Richard’s youngest sister and she and her husband, Jon, have three girls, Amelia, Juliet, and Violet. We had two lovely days with them, including a trip to Freeport for supper and a walk around the LLBean main campus.
diner in Maine
diner 2

bean boot
D front
Vi
Vi swim
Julie
Vi

Vacation in New Hampshire

Richard, Douglas, and I recently spent a few days in New Hampshire in the White Mountains. Richard took along his DJI Phantom II drone and GoPro Hero 3 camera.

R and D at waterfall

This meant I was carrying the Nikon D7000.
waterfallWe spent time at a waterfall.

D taking shot

R1

D1

R2

 

R3Anybody wondering who I still have eyes for after 24 years?

up the mountain

 

We then climbed a (short) mountain.

resting

Where we first caught our breath.

droneAnd then Richard fired up the drone.

drone up

 

Here it is in the sky.

viewsI took a few of these landscape shots, but I didn’t like some of the blown highlights. He reminded me to take bracketed images. So, I did.

landscape3

 

landscape4

The video Richard shot with the drone is pretty amazing. And he didn’t lose the drone down the mountain!

Family in England

I’ll be sharing a few photos from our recent (unanticipated) trip to England. We went to see a family member with health concerns.

 family in living roomThis is my favorite photograph from the batch. Richard’s Mom, Silvana, is just left of center in a green cardigan. She is flanked by her daughters Sophie (on left of photo) and Ariane. The young man is Ariane’s son, James. He is holding his daughter, Taiya. Richard’s Dad, Tony, is behind Ariane. Four generations!

Richard & T

Richard can never resist teasing a gigglebox.

R & S and cameraRichard brought his Canon C100 to show his mother some of the video stuff he’s been working on and how he does it.

Richard Sophie Eth and Harriett

We drove down to Illminster to visit with two of Sophie’s kids, Harriett and Ethan.

tony

Tony Campbell.

Reasons to Keep the Second Best Shots

Deciding whether to save non-optimal images is something all photographers face. Back in the days when photographs were captured on rolls of film, it was a no-brainer to keep the negatives at the very least. Nowadays, it is tempting to delete the images we don’t immediately recognize as good ones. After all, high quality digital images take up a lot of space on hard drives. Here’s yet another reason to reconsider hitting the delete button. Yesterday I shared an image from a PTA meeting about 40 years ago. In the “best image” many faces are obscured. When I consider the sequence of images, however, I can identify many more people. You can see what I mean.
alternate view 1
alternate 2
alternate 3

Singing at a PTA meeting in the early 70s

My mother and I are working slowly but surely toward getting her 40 plus years of negatives organized, and a selection of them scanned. We got a big batch of scanned images back recently, and I finally had time to take a close look. Here’s a fun one. This was taken shortly after we moved to Mississippi, probably in 1973. My classmates and I are in the Richardson Primary School cafeteria, performing at a PTA meeting.

RichardsonPTASequence-1

I happen also to be in the midst of helping plan a party celebrating the 30th anniversary of our graduation from Port Gibson High School. I have a feeling we’ll get some laughs from these old photographs. I see our class president Morise Duffin and Stephani Barnes, Tabatha Martin, Sheila Dorsey, Tamara Henderson, Joe Wilson, Patrick Mackey, Sonya Chapman. Other angles in other shots give me Pearl Smith and Dejuan Griffin. Help me with some of the other identifications, classmates.

International Reading Association 2014

I am finally home after a long road stretch. For the next few posts, I’ll catch you up on where I’ve been. I started with a trip to New Orleans to present a session and sign books at the International Reading Association National Conference.
Jess Sarah IRA

My sister, Jessica, and I presented a session with Dr. Amy Broemmel titled, “Reading and Writing Science Books: Paths to Creating Authentic Informational Texts.” Our session drew on our experience with a bookmaking project earlier this year at Girls Prep Charter School – Bronx, which is where Jessica is the reading specialist.

Amy Broemmel

Here is Amy, who teaches at the University of Tennessee – Knoxville, talking about a list she developed of good mentor texts for specific types of writing.
looking at the girls' books

Jessica brought along some examples of the books published by the students at Girls Prep.

IRA 2014 Session-0376

I began my presentation, as I almost always do, with a reading of Wolfsnail: A Backyard Predator. It was the first time my editor, Sarah Zhang, had heard me present. She took these photographs.
Sarah with QAL
I noticed Queen Anne’s Lace growing on the side of the interstate so I stopped to pick some for Sarah. We used it to decorate the table at my signing.
IRA 2014 signing-0387
Our signing was a success.
cousins
I learned through Facebook that my cousin, Meg Sanford, a first grade teacher, was also in town for IRA. So, we met up for dinner along with Jessica and her husband JC, my friend, Julie, and some of Meg’s colleagues. It was a fun way to end the day.

Horn Book Gives Mysterious Patterns Strong Review

mysterious patterns coverMy Horn Book magazine arrived yesterday with the review for Mysterious Patterns: Finding Fractals in Nature. It brought a big smile to my face.

“Bring up the math term fractals in a roomful of adults, and it’s likely quite a few eyes will glaze over. Yet wife-and-husband team Sarah and Richard Campbell (Growing Patterns: Fibonacci Numbers in Nature, rev. 5/10) succeeds in making fractals accessible and engaging to—get this—the elementary-school crowd. Sarah Campbell’s writing is clear, fluid, and concise, effortlessly so.”

The review is illustrated with a spread from the book (pp.12-13), which explains fractals and illustrates the explanation with a graphic of a fractal tree and a photograph of a living tree. Here’s a blog post from the day we took the tree photographs.

It still gives me thrill to see my work reviewed in The Horn Book because it has been part of my education in children’s books. “Glossy, well-designed pages feature crisp, up-close photographs, which pair perfectly with the text — making this the go-to choice for introducing fractals to children (and grownups).

Back-to-Back Conferences

On Friday, I drive to New Orleans to present at the International Reading Association‘s Annual Conference. I’ll be doing a session Saturday called “Reading and Writing Science Books? Paths to Creating Authentic Informational Texts,” with Dr. Amy Broemmel, who teaches pre-service teachers at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, and Jessica Crosby-Pitchamootoo, who is a reading specialist at Girls Prep Charter School Bronx in New York. I spent a few days at Girls Prep in March, which you can read about here.

I will be signing copies of Mysterious Patterns and my other books on Sunday at 10 a.m. at the Boyds Mills Press booth.

On Monday, I fly to Pennsylvania for Writing About Nature, a Highlights workshop held at the homeplace of Highlights’ founders, Garry and Caroline Meyers. I’m excited to be on a faculty that includes Dianna Hutts AstonSallie WolfDebbie S. Miller, Mark Baldwin, and Andy Boyles (science editor at Highlights). I’ll be presenting a session titled “Photos + Stories = Winning Nonfiction,” critiquing manuscripts, and learning more about nature journaling and photography.

Boston Globe Review

The Boston Globe ran a nice review of Mysterious Patterns, too. “Sarah C. Campbell, aided by photographs she and her husband, Richard P. Campbell took, explains what does (lightning) and doesn’t (a swallowtail caterpillar’s markings) constitute a fractal. She delivers a tidy education, gives a nod to the use of fractals in the built world, and offers the hope that readers will invent new uses.

Read full review here.